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What's the function of antisense

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What's the function of antisense

Postby victor » Sun Jun 19, 2005 11:38 am

We know that DNA is double helixed chain containing sense and antisense which is matched form one to another (if the sense is A then antisense is T). If sense chain is use to transcripts an mRNA as codon, then what is the function of the other chain which is antisense?
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Postby jonofbridger » Sun Jun 19, 2005 4:16 pm

I thought it was to protect the sense chain...
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Jun 19, 2005 7:56 pm

In protin synthesis, there is none. But this double helix structure makes replication possible... ARN can not replicate itself because it is monocatenar. I am talking about semiconservative replication of DNA here, by the way :D
It also makes the DNA molecule alot more stable.
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Postby victor » Tue Jun 21, 2005 12:19 pm

Oh yes..I forget about the semiconservative one where sense chain make the new double helix and the antisense chain do the same thing.. :oops:
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Postby victor » Wed Jun 22, 2005 7:59 am

Um, if you said that antisense DNA is useful for keeping the doublehelix stable then why sometimes we transcripts the antisense DNA become anticodon? what is the function of anticodon? is it one of the RNA?
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Postby MrMistery » Wed Jun 22, 2005 5:49 pm

Ok, i am sorry if i answer the wrong question but you should look into your spelling :wink:
Anticodon is present on the tRNA. As we know(or should know) there are 45 types of transport RNA. Each one codes a specific aminoacid. The way that a specific tRNA recognises a codon on the mRNA is a zone on the tRNA called anicodon or nodoc. This is made out of 3 nucleotides, the base pairs are complements of the bases of the codon
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Postby victor » Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:59 am

Ok..I understand now..just shorten the translation isn't it? so, if we are told to translate amino-acid from DNA...just take the nodoc.. :wink:
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Postby MrMistery » Thu Jun 23, 2005 7:48 pm

If they give you a certain DNA codon: let's say TAC and they tell it is from the cathene where mRNA forms, you will know the mRNA codon is AUG. By looking in the genetic code(no, you don't need to know it by heart unless you don't have anything better to do with your time that learn it) you find out that it is the start codon, metionine. From the codon AUG you can deduct the nodoc UAC but it doesn't help you much... In fact, the nodoc is just like the DNA sequence except it has U instead of T
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Postby victor » Sat Jun 25, 2005 12:48 pm

Hmm..defining nodoc is pointless then... :?
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Jun 26, 2005 8:30 pm

By the way, i realise now that I made a mistake. I don't know what I was thinking. RNA can replicate itself, in RNA viruses
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Postby victor » Mon Jun 27, 2005 7:38 am

In that case...it's true because in the beginning of life the first creation or the nucleic acid is RNA...and RNA can replicate itself to form DNA which is more stable..
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Postby Guest » Mon Jun 27, 2005 11:34 am

true true
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