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What does hemagglutination look like?

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What does hemagglutination look like?

Postby Lornadoon » Thu May 29, 2008 3:59 pm

Hi. I'm a PhD student and I've been doing hemagglutination experiments to detect lectin activity in my samples (solubalised cells froma toxic species).

My samples lyse live blood cells so I've been using fixed cells (I've fixed them myself). But the fixed cells gave unclear results in the v-welled plates (I know its quite subjective with normal blood but with my fixed blood it was impossible). So i thought i'd look at the cells under the microscope to see if they are clumped. But is that what agglutination looks like? Clumped cells? Noone seems to be able to give me a staraight answer.

Also, whilst on the topic of fixed blood, where can you buy pre-fixed blood? And do people recommend buying it pre-fixed as its quite a long protocol to fix it and I and I don't want to damage the blood too much so would rather an expert did it for me.

Thanks!
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Postby DoctorStein » Fri May 30, 2008 10:26 am

Yes, hemagglutination is clumped cells, based on antigen:antibody reaction, in this case particle antigen on the surface of RBC and antibody in the serum.

If you want to see the nice agglutination in fresh blood (not fixed blood), you can do regular ABO blood typing test with appropriate antiserum.

To get fresh blood, you can go to hospital and asking for whole-blood for transfusion.

Hope this helps. I'm sorry if I misunderstand your question due to my poor English.

Here, I found a good microphotograph of hemagglutination:

Image
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Re: What does hemagglutination look like?

Postby Lornadoon » Mon Jun 02, 2008 8:10 am

Thank you Doctor Stein. The picture is a real help. The only problem is that a toxin in my sample causes the blood cells to burst. That is why I must use fixed blood. But thank you for your suggestion and it is very useful to see what agglutination looks like. Thank you!
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