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Bryophytes

Plants!

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Postby MrMistery » Wed Jun 22, 2005 7:07 pm

Ok, so it may be possible to have auxin, but as you could not translocate it, it would be more of a local hormone... Not like auxin in superior plants which travels trough the whole plant...
I will look into this
@mothroc
I do read a lot of botany books but all of them are in romanian and the titles would not help you very much. You should go to your local library. If that does not work(and there's a good chance of it not working) go to a bookstore where they sell college courses in biology-you will find something there for sure
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Postby MrMistery » Wed Jun 22, 2005 7:19 pm

They have it. Guess I was wrong...
ancient lineages of living land plants. For example, current graduate student DorothyBelle Poli is studying how these bryophytes generate post-embryonic axes, which is the key process for constructing plant bodies. In contemporary vascular plants (e.g., ferns, gymnosperms, flowering plants), axis formation is regulated by polar transport of the hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) via specific transmembrane proteins; therefore, DB decided to investigate the mechanism of auxin movement in bryophyte axes. She discovered a well-defined sequence of incremental evolution in auxin movement mechanisms within the bryophytes: simple diffusion in hornworts, facilitated apolar diffusion in liverworts, and genuine polar transport in mosses. One plausible interpretation of these observations is that the earliest land plants evolved increasingly sophisticated mechanisms for regulating axis formation, with the common ancestor of the moss-vascular plant lineage evolving a hormonal mechanism preadapted for constructing the long axes of vascular plants.
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Postby victor » Mon Jun 27, 2005 7:34 am

Any other phytohormones? oh I ever heard that beside giberellin, there's another hormone which have the same function as it..the name is...err..Brassilionde (if I'm not mistaken)..is it true?
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Postby MrMistery » Mon Jun 27, 2005 9:25 pm

I never heard of Brassilionde... It seems briophites have giberelin and citokinines too... But the book I read is not so credible, i found a few wrong things in it....
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Postby victor » Wed Jun 29, 2005 8:55 am

Well, of course you can't find it in your textbook..that's the newest research on the plant. They said that if the plant doesn't lack of Giberellin but it's still short then the factor might be on that hormone..
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