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MOSQUITO AND AIDS

Debate and discussion of any biological questions not pertaining to a particular topic.

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Re: MOSQUITO AND AIDS

Postby adihutama » Fri Apr 08, 2011 9:35 am

I once read that there are some compound in mosquito saliva or perhaps their 'straw' that can kill or attenuate the virus.
Has anyone read about this too? It s kinda long ago...
If so, how do you think we can control HIV spread using this? Or even to cure it?
Sorry for not being too scientific, its a tingling question :D
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Postby Darby » Sat Apr 09, 2011 12:43 pm

There are a lot of chemicals that will make HIV fall apart. I don't know if the chemicals in mosquito saliva would do it, but you won't want a whole-body dose of mosquito saliva - it's an anticoagulant, and most people are allergic to it.
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Postby adihutama » Mon Apr 11, 2011 7:27 am

oh really, I just know that, so thats what make the mosquito bite itch a lot? or no?
What are these chemical that make HIV fall apart, are they dangerous for human body?
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Postby Darby » Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:00 pm

They probably would be, as a full-body dose. Lots of chemicals that affect disease organisms can't be made into drugs for the same reason.
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Postby adihutama » Tue Apr 12, 2011 2:23 am

yes I am aware of that, so what s our hope in fighting HIV now? :)
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Postby sharleenreyna » Wed Apr 20, 2011 9:15 am

According to Jonathan F. Day, of the University of Florida's Medical Entomology Laboratory, insects can transmit viruses in two ways, mechanically and biologically. With mechanical transmission, infected blood on the insect's mouthparts might be carried to another host while the blood is still fresh and the virus is still alive. Infection by this means is possible but highly unlikely, because mosquitoes seldom have fresh blood on the outside of their mouthparts. Mechanical transmission does occur in horses, however, with equine infectious anemia, a virus closely related to AIDS and transmitted by horseflies. These flies are "pool feeders"; their bite causes a small puddle of blood to form, and they immerse their mouthparts, head, and front legs while lapping it up. If disturbed, however, they quickly move on to another horse, where the fresh blood of the two hosts may mingle. Blood-feeding mosquitoes are much neater and more surgical; they insert a tube for drawing blood, and by the time they are ready for their next meal, even on a second host after an interrupted meal, any viruses from their first meal are safely stored away in their midgut.
With biological transmission, the pathogen must complete a portion of its life cycle within the carrier, or vector, species. Protozoans that cause malaria, for instance, go through an extremely complex cycle inside the mosquito, eventually congregating in the salivary glands, from which they may infect avian, primate, rodent, or reptilian hosts, depending on the malaria species. The HIV virus, however, does not replicate or develop in the mosquito; once in the insect's gut , the virus quickly dies. Repeated studies since 1986 show that AIDS-infected blood fed to mosquitoes and other arthropods does not live to be passed on and that, fortunately, there is no biological-transmission cycle of AIDS in blood-feeding arthropods, which frequently ingest the virus as part of their blood meal.
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Postby adihutama » Tue Apr 26, 2011 7:34 am

can it mean that chemical in our digestive tract kill the virus too?
in a simpler sentence: what would happen if we swallow blood or other body fluid of infected person?
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Postby Darby » Tue Apr 26, 2011 2:41 pm

Very few viruses can make it through our stomach acid intact. Most so-called "stomach viruses" are non-viral food poisonings.

For AIDS, if you have open lesions in your mouth, throat, or esophagus, swallowing blood or semen can infect you before the virus reaches the stomach.
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Postby adihutama » Wed Apr 27, 2011 9:21 am

okay

then why, scientifically talking, can the virus be transmitted and infect people through sexual intercourse then?
Does the womb and ovary have open access to blood circulation or something?
Sorry if it sounds riddiculous, scores very bad at anatomy :D

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Postby JackBean » Wed Apr 27, 2011 10:51 am

First, you can have always some small injuries (that's why is the anal sex so dangerous regarding HIV transmission, because the rectum can easily get injured) and mainly, there is no killing enviroment in vagina, so the virus is not killed immediately as in the stomach ;)
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.
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