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Logic/emotions/Self-preservation

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Logic/emotions/Self-preservation

Postby genovese » Tue Jan 29, 2008 2:26 pm

The archipallium (old primitive part of our brain) is mainly associated with self-preservation and reflex activity.
The paleopallium (intermediate part of brain) is the main area of the lymbic system dealing with emotions and feelings. The neopallium (involved with logic and abstract thinking) is the last part of the brain to have developed during evolution and present in all mammals.

We know that increase in sensory inputs leads to an increase in emotional feelings and to a decrease in logical thinking. Could this be a protective response? Is this a case of the higher part of the brain becoming saturated with information and being shut off by the limbic system so that the individual can respond with the old self-preservation reflexes embedded in the old brain?
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Postby mcar » Tue Jan 29, 2008 2:59 pm

I remember here defense mechanisms, that would be akin to protective response. I think that its analogous in a way that for example if this primitive part is for self-preservation, think of the past when man is just concern of how is he suppose to survive? he is just concern of the the basic things. Indulging on something that will satisfy your needs would be the same as to self-preservation; I see that the primitive man has not yet fully developed higher logic and abstract thinking in which most of us at the present have at least. It also reminded me of the ego that when not balanced, it leads to egocentrism; where what is important to you is what you want and what you feel from it. Well, I have opened about that ego thing, may I ask, are these ego and archipallium have something in common?
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Re:

Postby genovese » Tue Jan 29, 2008 3:07 pm

mcar wrote: I see that the primitive man has not yet fully developed higher logic and abstract thinking in which most of us at the present have at least. It also reminded me of the ego that when not balanced, it leads to egocentrism; where what is important to you is what you want and what you feel from it. Well, I have opened about that ego thing, may I ask, are these ego and archipallium have something in common?


I need to clarify that reptiles just have a primitive brain and so do not feel emotions. Early mammals developed a second part to their brain called the lymbic system, where emotions are felt and relayed to the old part of the brain and later on more developed mammals evolved a third component to the brain called the neocortex where the logical thinking occurs.

So primitive man would have had all three parts of the brain functioning and so would be able to think logically and enjoy abstract thoughts. I cannot imagine ego as existing in a primitive reptilian brain, so ego has nothing in common with archipallium brain. In embryology all three parts of the brain can be seen to form in sequence as they did through evolution.
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Postby mcar » Wed Jan 30, 2008 12:55 pm

As I see in your response, this archipallium is more related to the reptilian brain, right? well, if evolution is concerned, I see here how must the brain (our brain) was able to develop from a sort of primitive form with the archipallium part of the brain to its present state. You could be right that as a reptile,the ego is unlikely present. Actually, I presumed here that the primitive man has not yet fully developed more of the critical thinking skills, and I was able to think of a possible link on the relationship of this self-preservation aspect to the ego.
genovese wrote: We know that increase in sensory inputs leads to an increase in emotional feelings and to a decrease in logical thinking. Could this be a protective response? Is this a case of the higher part of the brain becoming saturated with information and being shut off by the limbic system so that the individual can respond with the old self-preservation reflexes embedded in the old brain?

Well, possibly that it can respond to such self-preservation aspect. I see here a somewhat feedback mechanism that will maintain balance afterall that we must be already reaching beyond the threshold level from certain sensory inputs that our brain is capable of processing with.
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Postby mcar » Tue Feb 12, 2008 12:59 pm

Maybe you would like to read this article.
http://cognews.com/1195706816/index_html
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Postby genovese » Tue Feb 12, 2008 3:04 pm

Thank you. Intriguing question deciding the origins of consciousness. I can visualize how the evolution of the mid-brain on top of the primitive hind brain adding emotional feelings of caring for the young would have been beneficial to the species. Having acquired the benefit of emotions I can only guess that the next evolutionary pressure would have been to try and control and understand those emotions and that modulations of mid brain activity by the developing forebrain would have given us self awareness and abstract thinking.
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