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Are tissues in the body capable of sensing pain?

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Re: Are tissues in the body capable of sensing pain?

Postby Darby » Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:51 pm

Nerve cells, including pain receptors, extend axons from the central system to whereever they exist in the eventual adult. The tracks respond to the environment, which helps "steer" them to their destination. They get there the same way that other axons, such as the ones that run muscles, get where they need to be.

As other have said, pain is a way of getting the individual to stop doing something that is damaging them. We don't have pain receptors everywhere - some internal organs have virtually none. They are typically chemical detectors, responding to materials released from damaged cells and during inflammation, among other things, and chemical detection is an ancient ability.

"Tissues" means a couple of not-completely-compatible things - technically, it's a way to categorize cell types (there are only four or five basic animal tissue types), but not technically, it's the "stuff" we're made up of (which all contain multiple technical-tissue types).
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Postby MrMistery » Thu Jan 03, 2008 1:29 pm

a little important extra info: though the per se pain receptors are chemical, impulses from ALL receptors can be processed as pain by the brain if they are too intense. If you are asleep and the light is turned off and someone turns it on, your eyes hurt when you try to open them, don't they? There's visual pain for you.
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Postby volcob » Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:23 am

the brain decides wether to call it pain or not
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Re: Are tissues in the body capable of sensing pain?

Postby MichaelXY » Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:01 am

some internal organs have virtually none.


This is where inferred pain comes in. eg. left arm hurts during a heart attack.
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Re:

Postby deostroll » Fri Jan 04, 2008 10:26 am

MrMistery wrote:a little important extra info: though the per se pain receptors are chemical, impulses from ALL receptors can be processed as pain by the brain if they are too intense. If you are asleep and the light is turned off and someone turns it on, your eyes hurt when you try to open them, don't they? There's visual pain for you.

I would try to explain this as upsurge of electrical activity under some set of physical conditions which prevail when we are unconscious. This upsurge causes pain. And it goes away when we regain consciousness signifying change in the physical environment around the concerned neurons. Does it make sense ? :?
PS: I happen to be a philosopher, rather than a true scientist...
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Postby MrMistery » Sat Jan 05, 2008 7:49 pm

not to me... perhaps you could explain your hypothesis a little more thorough
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Re:

Postby volcob » Tue Jan 08, 2008 1:12 am

MrMistery wrote:a little important extra info: though the per se pain receptors are chemical, impulses from ALL receptors can be processed as pain by the brain if they are too intense. If you are asleep and the light is turned off and someone turns it on, your eyes hurt when you try to open them, don't they? There's visual pain for you.


the tissues in your eyes gets hurt by the intensity of light as the iris' opening is wide then the receptors tell the brain that its gonna do some damaging
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Re: Are tissues in the body capable of sensing pain?

Postby MichaelXY » Tue Jan 08, 2008 1:37 am

I would think it is more because the transition from dark to light is quicker than the pupil reacts. For a transitional moment pain is perceived until the eye adjust.
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Re: Are tissues in the body capable of sensing pain?

Postby volcob » Thu Jan 10, 2008 4:20 am

MichaelXY wrote:I would think it is more because the transition from dark to light is quicker than the pupil reacts. For a transitional moment pain is perceived until the eye adjust.


and because the pupil had not yet reacted it has allowed light more than the its threshold level could take
eye tissues are very sensitive to light because they get damaged
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Postby MrMistery » Thu Jan 10, 2008 6:42 pm

actually the cause has to do with the adaptation of the eye to light. the darkness causes all the retinen in cone cells to associate with its opsin partner, leading to an increased sensitivity of the cell to intense light. When the light is turned on, it overwhelms the receptor. It takes a few minutes for the eye to adapt and to switch from rod cells to cone cells. I believe the term for this is receptor up-regulation.

But anyway, it was only an example to ilustrate my point.
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Re: Are tissues in the body capable of sensing pain?

Postby volcob » Sat Jan 12, 2008 6:09 am

what Im trying to point out is that no matter how intense a stimulus or a neuro transmitter is it would not cause pain if it does not damage the tissue

I thought of the skin for example
the skin is exposed to the afternoon sun. It is intense and hot but the skin wont hurt (you will feel it only after sometimes)

but the moment you take away the stratumn corneum you will feel the pain the very moment you expose yourself on it because it does damage the next layer

Its just an analogy to the eye and the light as the stimulus
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Postby MrMistery » Tue Jan 15, 2008 2:26 pm

not quite... The body has a function so that potentially harmful stimuli are interpreted as pain - that is the case of light. Also, when you touch a hot stove you don't burn your finger immediately, because the very high temperature alerts the body "Hey you idiot take your hand away from there, it's hot and will burn you"(not the best example cause that is a spinal reflex, but still you see my point)
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