Login

Join for Free!
117015 members


Why can't hemolymph in insects carry oxigen??

For discussing the functions of different structures of all organisms.

Moderator: BioTeam

Why can't hemolymph in insects carry oxigen??

Postby Ailey » Sun Sep 23, 2007 4:00 pm

Heya!

I was just surfing the net, trying to find the answer to this question, when I found that page and thought you might help me. I know that hemolymh serves to transport only nutrients but not oxygen... But what's the reason that it can't transport oxygen too, like in mammals?

Thanx for your help....
Ailey
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 3:50 pm

Postby Jammerz » Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:01 pm

Hemolymph is not found in humans... you're probably thinking of hemoglobin.

The reason hemolymph doesn't have the capacity to carry oxygen is because it doesn't need to. Insects are small and their gas exchange takes place through diffusion, so they don't need an oxygen-carrying molecule to transport it.
Jammerz
Death Adder
Death Adder
 
Posts: 77
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 4:02 am
Location: USA

Postby Ailey » Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:41 pm

I know that it isn't found in humans... I was thinkikng about insects yes...

Thanx for your answer:) that was exactly what i needed...
Ailey
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 3:50 pm


Postby Darby » Mon Sep 24, 2007 7:24 pm

Except that diffusion's not the right answer - insects use a separate oxygen distribution system, the tracheal system, although some do carry oxygen in the hemolymph, using a variety of carriers. Insects are too large (and waterproof) and have metabolisms that are much too high for simple diffusion to work for them.
Darby
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 1262
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:29 pm
Location: New York, USA

Postby Jammerz » Mon Sep 24, 2007 10:07 pm

Simple diffusion alone would not be enough to provide oxygen to larger or more active insects' tissues. Diffusion in insects is aided by the tracheal system, which delivers oxygen to all its tissues; this is aided further in some insects by simple ventilation due to movement of wings and muscle contractions. Since oxygen is provided directly to tissues through the tracheal system's aided diffusion, the hemolymph is not needed (in most insects) to carry oxygen to tissues. Insects rely far more on this type of aided diffusion than larger animals, however, that's the point I was trying to get at.
My original answer was not detailed enough.
Jammerz
Death Adder
Death Adder
 
Posts: 77
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 4:02 am
Location: USA

Postby whizzbee » Mon Oct 01, 2007 3:51 pm

hemolymph can't transport oxygen because it doesn't have hemoglobin. is that true?? hmmpphh...
always aim for the sky, for if you fail, at least you can reach the clouds..
User avatar
whizzbee
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2007 3:35 am
Location: Indonesia

Postby MrMistery » Mon Oct 01, 2007 7:00 pm

not exactly. in some invertebrates, other respiratory pigments fulfill the role of oxygen transport. examples include hemocyanin and clorolorine.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

Postby whizzbee » Wed Oct 03, 2007 3:59 pm

then, hemolymph can't carry oxygen because of it doesn't contain other respiratory pigments that take role in oxygen transport?? or there's another reason for it?? what's the exact reason?
always aim for the sky, for if you fail, at least you can reach the clouds..
User avatar
whizzbee
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2007 3:35 am
Location: Indonesia

Postby Darby » Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:23 pm

Sometimes hemolymph does carry oxygen - in crustaceans and marine arthropods, it's fairly common. In insects, which often have relatively high metabolisms, an open circulatory system just isn't efficient enough for oxygen distribution all by itself.

And some insects do use hemoglobin, but not contained in cells...houseflies, for example...
Darby
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 1262
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:29 pm
Location: New York, USA

Postby February Beetle » Thu Jan 17, 2008 4:53 am

Bloodworms another example of insects using hemoglobin for obtaining oxygen. (aquatic fly larva that are sometimes used to feed pet fish)
Image

Man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion. - Henry Benson
User avatar
February Beetle
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 690
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2005 2:47 am
Location: Kansas

Re: Why can't hemolymph in insects carry oxigen??

Postby Darby » Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:42 pm

Bloodworm is a very generic term, but I don't know of any that are insect larvae - they usually are some type of annelid, which do use oxygen carriers in their blood as the main distribution system.
Darby
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 1262
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:29 pm
Location: New York, USA

Postby February Beetle » Fri Feb 15, 2008 5:45 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chironomidae non-biting midges are an example of an insect larvae called blood worms because of the hemoglobin.
Image

Man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion. - Henry Benson
User avatar
February Beetle
King Cobra
King Cobra
 
Posts: 690
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2005 2:47 am
Location: Kansas


Return to Physiology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron