Login

Join for Free!
118477 members


Deep Sea Fauna

Animals!

Moderator: BioTeam

Deep Sea Fauna

Postby Zachthemac » Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:12 am

I'm curious as to how some fish and crustaceans have adapted the ability to live with the high pressure of the deep sea. Why is it that a human's rib cage would collapse and he would die instantly, but the wildlife at this depth are able tol survive? Thanks for any comments.
Zachthemac
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:57 pm

Postby MrMistery » Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:29 am

Each species has a fundamental niche and a realised niche. Because of competition for food those animals only live in a small part of their fundamental niche, called realised niche. They were forced to live there, and adapted adequately by developing harder bones and tougher structures to resist it. That was their evolutionary path. Humans are adapted to the presure at the surface of 1 atm. If they go into the deep, they are out of their realised niche and intruding on someone else's teritory. They can not survive there because they lack those adaptations. Get it?
Regards
Andrew
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

Postby Zachthemac » Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:15 pm

Thanks. I understand what you are saying, but even standard submarines will be crushed in the deepest parts of the oceans, so how could a fish's bones be built stronger than the sub's steel hull?
Zachthemac
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:57 pm


Postby mith » Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:57 pm

eh, I dunno how but I know these deep sea critters explode when they come to the surface, I bet a lot has to do with the circulatory system more than the bones...(think what happens when we go to space without a spacesuit)
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby Zachthemac » Sat Jun 04, 2005 2:04 pm

EXPLODE?

Here is an interesting adaptation:
For example, said Edward Seidel, enzymes, which are essential for functions such as digesting food, have specific shapes that allow them to function under the extreme pressure of the deep sea.

"When you release that pressure, the shape of the enzyme changes, and since it changes, it no longer functions and the animal no longer can survive," he said.
Zachthemac
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:57 pm

Postby MrMistery » Sat Jun 04, 2005 5:53 pm

Mithril is right. The circulatory system also needs to be adapted. Interesting thing with those enzymes.
Yes, explode. BEing very well adapted to the immense pressure of the deep when they come to normal pressure they explode.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

Postby doctor phil » Wed Feb 01, 2006 6:50 pm

the best known deep sea animal is the giant squid. my friends say theve found one, but i dont think its whole
doctor phil
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2006 6:25 pm

Postby David George » Mon Mar 06, 2006 8:56 am

This isn't science fiction. A set of extraordinary images captured by Japanese scientists marks the first-ever record of a live giant squid (Architeuthis) in the wild.

The animal—which measures roughly 25 feet (8 meters) long—was photographed 2,950 feet (900 meters) beneath the North Pacific Ocean. Japanese scientists attracted the squid toward cameras attached to a baited fishing line.

The scientists say they snapped more than 500 images of the massive cephalopod before it broke free after snagging itself on a hook. They also recovered one of the giant squid's two longest tentacles, which severed during its struggle.

The photo sequence, taken off Japan's Ogasawara Islands in September 2004, shows the squid homing in on the baited line and enveloping it in "a ball of tentacles."
User avatar
David George
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 317
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 12:48 pm
Location: India [place where religion rules people]


Return to Zoology Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron