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sporophytic haploids....is it true?

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sporophytic haploids....is it true?

Postby sunshine » Sat Aug 11, 2007 10:30 am

Can haploids be sporophytes?

Is this following sentence true about haploids....

"Haploids are sporophytes of higher plants with gametophytic chromosome number"

can anyone please give a clear explanation coz i am totally confused.
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Postby didymocarpus » Fri Sep 07, 2007 7:37 am

hi sunshine,
i would like to answer your first question,but i am not sure about certain things.It is a very good question.
Regarding your second question, in higher plants all sporophytes are diploid and all gametophytes are haploid.So, your statement is wrong.
bye
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Postby Cloud_D » Sun Oct 28, 2007 2:06 am

I think you're getting a bit confused with your terms. I'm guessing this from the way you phrase your sentence so forgive me if I'm wrong.

Haploid just means that something has a chromosome number of n.
Diploid means that it has a chromosome number of 2n.

So therefore, we say "something" is haploid/diploid, not the other way round.

To answer your question, as far as I know, all sporophytes of higher plants are 2n, as didymocarpus said.
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Postby sunshine » Sun Oct 28, 2007 4:27 am

yep..i am aware that haploids has 'n ' chromosome number and diploids have '2n' chromosomes...that sentence is from a plant biotechnology book...

so it would be nice to hear a clear expalination..

thankin you...!. :)
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Postby MrMistery » Sun Oct 28, 2007 3:32 pm

Ok, here it is.
All NATURAL sporophytes are diploid. However, it is possible to induce the development of halpoid plants by various biotechnology methods.
Let's say you work with cabbage(strictly arbitrary chosen example). You can induce development of a cabbage plant from a pollen grain, obtaining a haploid plant. However, you would still refer to it as a sporophyte, because sporophyte just means "spor producing". In angiosperms, the sporophyte is the plant. Of course, your cabbage would be unable to reproduce, but it would still grow fine and present several advantages(make it easy to select those plants with recessive genes, then pick your desired organisms and make them diploid with colchicine)

Regards,
Andrew
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
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Postby didymocarpus » Sat Dec 01, 2007 11:39 am

Explicit reply from Mr.Mistery.thank u :)
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Re: sporophytic haploids....is it true?

Postby sara135 » Tue Jul 12, 2011 8:23 am

flowering plants have a reproductive cycle in which a diploid sporophytic phase alternates with a haploid gametophytic phase. The plant represents the sporophyte, and the gametophytes are microscopic. As illustrated in the double fertilization entry, the male gametophyte is the pollen grain and the female gametophyte is the embryo sac. However, parthenogenetic development of unfertilized eggs can occur, but it is very rare. Haploid sporocytes were first reported in Datura stramonium (q.v.). The frequency of haploid plants can be greatly increased using anther culture (q.v.). Homozygous diploid plants can then be generated by treatment with colchicine (q.v.).
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