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lux genes

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lux genes

Postby mehdi71000 » Thu Jun 07, 2007 6:04 pm

Hi every one can you explain to me the lux genes please. I’ve read: "Note: Bacteria transformed with the pVIB plasmid must be grown at 30° C or less." does this apply to the protein responsible doesn’t function under 30c or the protein is destroyed above 30° C ?
Thanks
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Postby canalon » Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:19 pm

There may be plenty of reason, and since I do not know pVIB I cannot answer. I might be a question of protein stability, but it can also be a problem with the plasmid itself which become unstable (meaning the bacteria are losing it) at 37C, and is much more stable at lower temperature. Or it can also be something to do with regulator.
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Postby mehdi71000 » Fri Jun 08, 2007 12:10 am

Thanks man. Much appreciated :)

What if the gene is expressed inside a plant? Are the genes that get expressed in ecoli suitable for small animals and plant?
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Postby canalon » Fri Jun 08, 2007 2:30 am

Bacterial plasmid are not likely to be expressed in plants. You need special shuttle plasmids that can be expressed in both plants and bacteria for this kind of experiments. Same things for small animals.
Different hosts nedd different plasmids. Most of the plant plasmids will be derived from the Agrobacterium tumefasciens Ti plasmid, and usually transfered by the bacterium (I do not have protocol) rather than with a microinjector.
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Postby david23 » Fri Jun 08, 2007 2:47 pm

bacteria and eukaryote plasmids are different, it usually says which is which under the descriptions.
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