Login

Join for Free!
114369 members


storing banana in refrigerator

Plants!

Moderator: BioTeam

storing banana in refrigerator

Postby Biology teacher » Thu May 24, 2007 7:40 am

Hi everyone
I would like to know the reason why when storing banana in aluminum foil inside the refrigerator it doesn't spoil very fast .
Biology teacher
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 7:29 pm

Postby blcr11 » Thu May 24, 2007 1:46 pm

I always thought it was a bad thing to put a banana in the fridge. At least the outside turns black almost immediately (well, within 12-24 hours anyway). But I don't know if that preserves the pulp or not. I'm not a great fan of banana eating. I throw out all black bananas. I can imagine that putting anything at lower temperatures would slow down or even stop many enzyme reactions. If you can stop fruit pulp maturation by inhibiting enzymes, I suppose that could explain it--but I really don't know anything specific. I'm going to have to sacrifice a banana to the fridge next bunch I buy and see if it really does preserve anything.
blcr11
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2007 4:23 am

Postby ivygirl_5 » Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:28 pm

The cold temperature of your fridge encourages an enzyme (polyphenyl oxidase) naturally found in the banana to polymerise phenols in the banana skin into polyphenols . Polyphenols are similar to melanin, the pigment responsible for the colour in our skin. This is what blackens the skin of the bananas.
Dispite the color, the cold temperature will keep your banana firmer then a banana that was left at room temperature for the same amount of time. The enzymes that break the starch into sugar(which makes the banana soft and ripe) work better at room temperature.

If you want to make other fruit ripen quickly, stick the unripe fruit in a bag with a blackened fridge banana. The ethylene being given off by the damaged banana skin will facilitate the quick ripening of other fruits.
ivygirl_5
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 9:54 pm


Postby blcr11 » Thu Jun 07, 2007 12:21 am

I always wondered why that happened! Thanks for the explanation. I guess I could go look it up, but is the polymerization reaction "normal" or is it something that only happens in the cold? Curious. Now I'm going to have to go see if there is a structure for the enzyme and what is known about the mechanism.

Cool...I mean...hot? Well, you get what I mean.
blcr11
Viper
Viper
 
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2007 4:23 am

Postby mith » Thu Jun 07, 2007 4:15 pm

Wow nice, I thought the cold just damaged the cells somehow
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr
User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Postby MrMistery » Thu Jun 07, 2007 6:04 pm

I also found this interesting. I never placed a banana in the fridge, but I am going to do it now.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter
User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
 
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)

Postby Biology teacher » Thu Jun 07, 2007 7:24 pm

I would like to thank ivygirl_5 very much for the valuable info mentioned above .
Biology teacher
Garter
Garter
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 7:29 pm

Postby dr. dugmore » Tue Jun 12, 2007 5:54 am

hmmmm i did some work on this for a biology assessment! i cant find my papers but i will come back to this topic!!!
The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man.
Charles Darwin
User avatar
dr. dugmore
Coral
Coral
 
Posts: 173
Joined: Wed May 09, 2007 10:18 am
Location: australia mate!!!!! bloody oath!! >lol<


Return to Botany Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron