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ATP

Discussion of all aspects of biological molecules, biochemical processes and laboratory procedures in the field.

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ATP

Postby kml » Tue Dec 21, 2004 12:36 am

have a question drivin me nuts. I know what ATP is but this question is so easy it's making me look stupid.

What actually causes the breakdown of atp?
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Postby ERS » Tue Dec 21, 2004 3:10 am

by "breakdown" do you mean the use of ATP? The terminal (end) phosphate of ATP is hydrolzed and releases energy that is valuable for intracellular processes etc.. The big thing to consider is the reverse of breakdown, which is formation. ATP is formed from ADP and an inorganic phophate ion (Pi) which is not an energetically favorable state when compared to the end product of ATP, which is a VERY good thing for all of us...

if this wasn't what you were shooting for, expound a bit and we will get you some answers!
take care
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Postby biostudent84 » Tue Dec 21, 2004 4:49 pm

The actual breakdown in ATP is caused by gradient. A strange concept, one difficult for me to understand at first, so I will explain it as best I can.

ATP is a chemical that exists in the cell alongside ADP. ATP naturally has more energy in it, and is in an equilibrium reaction with ADP.

ATP<=>ADP+Phosphate+Energy

As energy is needed, it is taken out of ATP, a process actually caused by this equilibrium shifting to the right. When ATP is synthesized again, the equation shifts back to the left. To keep this equation able to shift easily to the right when needed, ATP will ALWAYS have a higher concentration than ADP will.
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Postby kml » Tue Dec 21, 2004 9:35 pm

Hey thanks for the answers to ATP biostudent84 and ers came through. I got the test question correct and saved my grade. :D Thanks
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