Login

Join for Free!
112477 members
table of contents table of contents

Attempts to employ nucleic acids in gene therapy have become commonplace in …


Biology Articles » Biochemistry » Nucleic Acid Biochemistry » Series Introduction: Emerging clinical applications of nucleic acids

Abstract
- Series Introduction: Emerging clinical applications of nucleic acids

Series Introduction: Emerging clinical applications of nucleic acids

Bruce A. Sullenger

Departments of Surgery and Genetics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA

Address correspondence to: Bruce A. Sullenger, Box 2601, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. Phone: (919) 684-6375; Fax: (919) 684-6492; E-mail: b.sullenger@cgct.duke.edu.

J. Clin. Invest. 106(8): 921-922 (2000).

 

Attempts to employ nucleic acids in gene therapy have become commonplace in recent years, but efficient gene transfer methods have proved unexpectedly difficult to devise, and safety concerns linger. At the same time, however, the study of nucleic acids has revealed remarkable properties of DNA and RNA molecules that could make them attractive therapeutic agents, independent of their well-known ability to encode biologically active proteins. Now would seem to be a good time to consider alternative uses of nucleic acids that do not rely on virus-based vectors or even on gene transfer.

Accordingly, the strategies explored in this Perspective series exploit a number of different facets of RNA and DNA biochemistry. Certain nucleic acid molecules can bind to and inhibit the function of target proteins, while others provide a source of tumor antigens, and still others can perform catalysis. Recently, therapies that employ nucleic acids in some of these novel ways have passed the stage of in vitro and animal tests and have begun to be evaluated in clinical trials for treating a variety of disorders. This Perspective series offers an update on the progress in this field.


rating: 0.00 from 0 votes | updated on: 25 Sep 2008 | views: 3375 |

Rate article:







excellent!bad…