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Biology Articles » Reproductive Biology » A Review of Nitrates in Drinking Water: Maternal Exposure and Adverse Reproductive and Developmental Outcomes » Introduction

Introduction
- A Review of Nitrates in Drinking Water: Maternal Exposure and Adverse Reproductive and Developmental Outcomes

The health implications of exposure to nitrates in drinking water were first reported in the scientific literature by Comly in 1945 after observing cyanosis in infants in Iowa, where well water was used in formula preparation (Comly 1987). Since then, most studies on the health effects of nitrates in drinking water have focused on infants because they are thought to be the most vulnerable to this exposure. More recent evaluations of the health implications of nitrates in drinking water have examined reproductive and developmental effects (Table 1) (Arbuckle et al. 1986, 1988; Dorsch et al. 1984; Fan and Steinberg 1996; Fan et al. 1987; Gelperin et al. 1975; Scragg et al. 1982; Super et al. 1981; Tabacova and Balabaeva 1993; Tabacova et al. 1997, 1998).

Data are insufficient on the incidence of methemoglobinemia among infants in the United States and on the effects that exposure to nitrate levels above the maximum contaminant limit (MCL) may have on other populations such as pregnant women. We do know that people in the United States who get their water from public water systems are occasionally exposed to biologically relevant doses of nitrate in their drinking water [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 1990]. In addition, a considerable number of people (~ 16% of the U.S. population) use private water systems that are usually located in areas considered more vulnerable to nitrate contamination (U.S. EPA 2002a).

In this review, we summarize the experimental and epidemiologic studies on nitrates in drinking water with reference to adverse reproductive and developmental effects. Previous reviews by Fan and colleagues (Fan and Steinberg 1996; Fan et al. 1987) focused on nitrates in drinking water, methemoglobinemia, and reproductive toxicity. In this review, we expand on these previous works, with a focus on maternal exposure and reproductive effects. Because a drinking water source may play a crucial role in exposure, we also present a discussion on sources and occurrence of nitrates in drinking water in the United States.


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