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In the present study functional values for isolated kidneys with different perfusion …


Biology Articles » Anatomy & Physiology » Physiology, Animal » Reference values and physiological characterization of a specific isolated pig kidney perfusion model

Abstract
- Reference values and physiological characterization of a specific isolated pig kidney perfusion model

Reference values and physiological characterization of a specific isolated pig kidney perfusion model

Volker Unger1, Christian Grosse-Siestrup1, Claudia Fehrenberg1, Axel Fischer2, Michael Meissler1 and David A Groneberg3,4

1Department of Comparative Medicine and Facilities of Experimental Animal Sciences, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Free and Humboldt-University Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany
2Allergy-Centre-Charité, Otto-Heubner-Centre, Pneumology and Immunology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin; Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin, Germany
3Institute of Occupational Medicine, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Ostpreussendamm 111, D-12207 Berlin, Germany
4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1 OE 6870, D-30625 Hannover, Germany

 

Background

Models of isolated and perfused kidneys are used to study the effects of drugs, hazardous or toxic substances on renal functions. Since physiological and morphological parameters of small laboratory animal kidneys are difficult to compare to human renal parameters, porcine kidney perfusion models have been developed to simulate closer conditions to the human situation, but exact values of renal parameters for different collection and perfusion conditions have not been reported so far. If the organs could be used out of regular slaughtering processes animal experiments may be avoided.

Methods

To assess renal perfusion quality, we analyzed different perfusion settings in a standardized model of porcine kidney hemoperfusion with organs collected in the operating theatre (OP: groups A-D) or in a public abattoir (SLA: group E) and compared the data to in vivo measurements in living animals (CON). Experimental groups had defined preservation periods (0, 2 and 24 hrs), one with additional albumin in the perfusate (C) for edema reduction.

Results

Varying perfusion settings resulted in different functional values (mean ± SD): blood flow (RBF [ml/min*100 g]: (A) 339.9 ± 61.1; (C) 244.5 ± 53.5; (D) 92.8 ± 25.8; (E) 153.8 ± 41.5); glomerular fitration (GFR [ml/min*100 g]: (CON) 76.1 ± 6.2; (A) 59.2 ± 13.9; (C) 25.0 ± 10.6; (D) 1.6 ± 1.3; (E) 16.3 ± 8.2); fractional sodium reabsorption (RFNa [%] (CON) 99.8 ± 0.1; (A) 82.3 ± 8.1; (C) 86.8 ± 10.3; (D) 38.4 ± 24.5; (E) 88.7 ± 5.8). Additionally the tubular coupling-ratio of Na-reabsorption/O2-consumption was determined (TNa/O2-cons [mmol-Na/mmol- O2] (CON) 30.1; (A) 42.0, (C) 80.6; (D) 17.4; (E) 23.8), exhibiting OP and SLA organs with comparable results.

Conclusion

In the present study functional values for isolated kidneys with different perfusion settings were determined to assess organ perfusion quality. It can be summarized that the hemoperfused porcine kidney can serve as a biological model with acceptable approximation to in vivo renal physiology, also if the organs originate from usual slaughtering processes.

Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology 2007, 2:1doi:10.1186/1745-6673-2-1

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.occup-med.com/content/2/1/1

Received: 16 November 2006
Accepted: 29 January 2007
Published: 29 January 2007

© 2007 Unger et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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