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The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis enhances plant tolerance to water deficit through …


Biology Articles » Anatomy & Physiology » Physiology, Plant » Mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Lactuca sativa plants exhibit contrasting responses to exogenous ABA during drought stress and recovery » Figures

Figures
- Mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Lactuca sativa plants exhibit contrasting responses to exogenous ABA during drought stress and recovery

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Figure 1 Percentage of mycorrhizal root length in lettuce plants inoculated with G. intraradices. See legend for Fig. 2.

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Figure 2 Shoot dry weight (g plant–1) in lettuce plants. Plants were either inoculated with G. intraradices (Gi) or remained non-inoculated (NI). White bars represent plants cultivated under well-watered conditions and black bars represent plants subjected to drought stress. Half of the plants were allowed to grow for an additional 3 d period in order to recover from drought (recovery) and the other half was harvested just after the drought stress period (–). Finally, plants were supplied with exogenous ABA just before and during the drought stress or recovery periods (+ABA) or did not receive ABA (No ABA). Bars represent means plus the standard error (n=5). Means followed by the same letter are not significantly different (P < 0.05) as determined by Duncan's multiple range test.

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Figure 3 Root dry weight (g plant–1) in lettuce plants. See legend for Fig. 2.

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Figure 4 Root hydraulic conductivity (Lo; mg H2O g–1 root DW MPa–1 h–1) in lettuce plants. See legend for Fig. 2.

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Figure 5 Transpiration rate (mg H2O cm–2 h–1) in lettuce plants. See legend for Fig. 2.

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Figure 6 ABA content (ng ABA g–1 leaf DW) in leaves of lettuce plants. See legend for Fig. 2.

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Figure 7 ABA content (ng ABA g–1 root DW) in roots of lettuce plants. See legend for Fig. 2.

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Figure 8 Northern blot of total RNA (15 µg) from lettuce shoots using Lsnced (accession no. AB120109), LsPIP2 (accession no. AJ937963), Lsp5cs (accession no. AJ715852), and Lslea (accession no. AJ704826) gene probes. Treatments are designed as NI, non-inoculated controls or Gi, plants inoculated with G. intraradices. Plants were cultivated under well-watered conditions (ww) or subjected to drought stress (ds) with (+ABA) or without addition of exogenous ABA (No ABA). Half of the plants were allowed to grow for an additional 3 d period in order to recover from drought (ww+R or ds+R) and the other half was harvested just after the drought stress period. The panel under each northern blot shows the amount of 26S rRNA loaded for each treatment. Numbers close to each northern blot represent the relative gene expression after normalization to rRNA.

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Figure 9 Northern blot of total RNA (15 µg) from lettuce roots. See legend for Fig. 8.

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