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Biology Articles » Conservation Biology » Huge Population Of Endangered Asian Elephants Living In Malaysian Park

Huge Population Of Endangered Asian Elephants Living In Malaysian Park

New data released by the Wildlife Conservation Society and Malaysia’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP) reveals that a population of endangered Asian elephants living in a Malaysian park may be the largest in Southeast Asia.

WCS and DWNP researchers estimate that there are 631 Asian elephants living in Taman Negara National Park – a 4,343 square kilometer (1,676 square mile) protected area in the center of Peninsular Malaysia. The new results confirm the largest-known population of elephants remaining in Southeast Asia.

The WCS/DWNP team counted elephant dung piles to estimate population size—a scientifically proven technique that produces accurate figures. There were no previous scientific population surveys for elephants in the park, according to DWNP and WCS.

“The surveys reveal the importance of Taman Negara in protecting wildlife especially those species that need large home ranges. DWNP will continue to safeguard this national park, which is the crown jewel of Malaysia’s protected areas system. The numbers of elephants is testament to the importance of the park in protecting wildlife,” said Dato’ Rasid, Director-General of the Department of Wildlife and National Parks.

“This new survey shows that Taman Negara National Park is one of the great strongholds for Asian elephants in Southeast Asia,” said Dr. Melvin Gumal, Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s conservation programs in Malaysia.

“People were unsure of how many elephants lived in the park before our survey, although there were good reasons to think that the population was substantial.”

The park, which contains one of the world’s oldest rainforests—dating back 130 million years, also supports tigers, leopards, dholes, numerous monkey species, and 350 types of birds.

Asian elephants are endangered due to habitat loss and poaching; between 30,000 and 50,000 may remain in 13 Asian countries.

The Department of Wildlife and National Parks protects wildlife and manages federal protected areas throughout Peninsular Malaysia, and the Wildlife Conservation Society works to protect Asian elephants throughout their Asian range.

Source : Wildlife Conservation Society

 


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