Login

Join for Free!
117488 members
table of contents table of contents

Recent analyses of human pathogens have revealed that their evolutionary histories are …


Biology Articles » Microbiology » Discovering human history from stomach bacteria » Figures

Figures
- Discovering human history from stomach bacteria

..................................................

Figure 1 The relationships between human populations, as calculated from H. pylori found in stomachs and from mitochondrial DNA data. (a) Relationships between modern subpopulations of H. pylori [5]. Each subpopulation is represented by a circle with a diameter proportional to the genetic diversity within it. The centres of the circles are joined by a phylogenetic tree showing the relationships between the four subpopulations. Bacteria in each subpopulation are found predominantly in people who originate from the regions shown. (b) A population-level phylogenetic tree of the H. pylori geographic subpopulations shown in (a). (c) A median-joining network of human populations derived from mitochondrial DNA [14]. Such a network shows alternative potential evolutionary relationships between clusters. Each circle represents a cluster of mitochondrial types with a diameter proportional to the frequency of that type within the subpopulations. All non-African populations are derived from one African lineage; the network of relationships within this lineage is magnified (top). (a,b) Adapted from [5]; (c) adapted from [14].

..................................................

Figure 2 A map of the pattern of expansion and migration of modern humans throughout the world, derived from studies of mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomes [14,15,17,18]. Numbers indicate the approximate time (in years before the present) when modern humans first appeared in the indicated region.

..................................................

Figure 3 Relationships of human polyoma JC virus (JCV) subtypes found in humans from different parts of the world [7]. Letters refer to individual subtypes. (a) The hypothesized pattern of spread of JCV subtypes through the world (excluding the Americas); (b) an inferred phylogeny of JCV subtypes, assuming an African origin for the virus. Adapted from [7].

..................................................


rating: 4.00 from 8 votes | updated on: 27 Aug 2007 | views: 7418 |

Rate article:







excellent!bad…